Home > News > company news > content
The garbage sorting robot is coming! Sorting 80 pieces per minute, the speed is

The garbage sorting robot is coming! Sorting 80 pieces per minute, the speed is twice that of people

 
Core Abstract: Classifying recyclable waste such as plastic, glass, and paper is a job that people don't mind handing over to artificial intelligence. And some waste disposal companies have begun to deploy and use artificial intelligence training machines to quickly and accurately classify waste. ...

 

  Classifying recyclable waste such as plastic, glass, and paper is a job that people don't mind handing over to artificial intelligence. And some waste disposal companies have begun to deploy and use artificial intelligence training machines to quickly and accurately classify waste.

 
The work of these tireless and efficient equipment is boring and dirty, and has established a leading position in many warehousing and other industry companies.

▲ AMP Robotics' custom machine can sort 80 items per minute, which is about twice the speed of ordinary people.
 
Single Stream Recyclers LLC, based in Sarasota, Fla., processes up to 350 tons of recyclable waste per day. The company said last week that it plans to add eight more robots from AMP Robotics to the existing six robots. With the help of these machines, the recycling operation will be able to achieve most of the automation.
 
According to John Hansen, corporate co-owner, the machine, custom-made by AMP Robotics, Louisville, CO, can sort 80 items per minute, about twice the speed of ordinary people. Automated equipment addresses the long-standing shortage of personnel in recycling centers. Recruiting waste sorters requires Single Stream Recyclers to assign a full-time employee from a human resources agency to post job advertisements, and the company is required to pay $10 to $12 an hourly salary to the recruited picker.
 
“The platform can do 95% of the waste sorting work,” Hansen said. He said that the AMP Robotics robot "twice the speed of ordinary robots and does not go wrong."
 
Kerry Sandford, senior consultant at Resource recycling Systems Inc. in Michigan, said that less than 5% of the garbage collection centers in the United States and Canada use robotic sorters.
 
AMP Robotics develops machine learning software and adds it to off-the-shelf robots from third-party vendors. These custom robots have a gripping arm, a visual sensor and a safety cage to protect nearby employees. The built-in algorithm of the robot is trained by a large number of images, including various recyclable wastes such as water bottles, beer cans, milk cans, and food packaging boxes. The image database contains various states of the recyclables that are intact, dent, and crushed. Sensors use computer vision to scan fast-moving objects, distinguishing objects by color, texture, shape, size, and material. The attachment of the robot uses the suction cup to grab the item from the conveyor belt and throw it into the corresponding garbage collection bin.
 
Matanya Horowitz, CEO and founder of AMP Robotics, said: “As long as people can identify things, our system can recognize them.” “All systems can be learned collectively. All robots are learning from different robots across the country.”
 
AMP Robotics deployed 24 similar systems in the United States. It is expected that this number will double by the end of this year.
 
In April of this year, Berkeley County, South Carolina, opened a recycling facility equipped with nine recycling robots from artificial intelligence developer Bulk Handling Systems. Bulk Handling Systems also uses off-the-shelf robots to execute its proprietary artificial intelligence algorithms.
 
Bulk Handling Systems is located in Eugene, Oregon, and Berkeley County is the largest single deployment site for this technology development company. Peter Raschio, director of marketing, said the company deployed 84 robots in 10 countries to sort plastic, metal, paper and other recyclable waste.
 
The cost of the recycling system developed by the company is about $200,000 per unit. AMP declined to disclose the price.
 
Hansen said that Single Stream Recyclers may take 18 months to 4 years to recover the cost of investing in AMP robots, depending on production, market price and other factors.
 
Robot developers are also racing to develop next-generation recycling technologies: sorting paper and other two-dimensional objects on crowded conveyors.
 
In April of this year, Bulk Handling Systems deployed an upgraded sorting paper robot that improved the ability to identify overlapping paper, partially visible paper and plastic. AMP Robotics also upgraded its robotics product in May this year: this dual-function robot, guided by an artificial intelligence "brain", is able to detect more areas and recognize overlapping paper on fast moving tapes.